Conference

The seventh annual Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference presents two full days of lively debate on emerging practices and issues within art-book culture. This year’s conference will feature a keynote address by the artist R. H. Quaytman in conversation with her mother, poet and scholar Susan Howe. May Castleberry, Editor of publications of the Library Council of The Museum of Modern Art, will moderate discussion about the new collaborative publication Tom Tit Tot. The work knits together sixty-seven poems by Howe, with design elements and original prints by Quaytman.  
 
Additional conference sessions will include panel discussions on such topics as design authorship, fashion publications, narrative photobooks, contemporary livres d’artistes, and graphic novels. This year will also see the return of the Pecha Kucha session, featuring ten speakers presenting for five minutes each. See below for schedule details and lists of speakers.  
 
All sessions are free but space is limited. General admission is first-come-first-seated.  
 
The Conference is organized by the CABC Committee, a national group of art library professionals. Funding for the Conference is supported by generous donations from Phil Aarons, Peter Norton, and David Teiger. Additional support has been provided by the Art Libraries Society of New York.
CABC COMMITTEE  
Stephen Bury, Frick Art Reference Library  
Matthew Carson, International Center for Photography Library  
Deirdre Donohue, International Center for Photography Library  
Ryan Haley, New York Public Library  
Milan Hughston, Museum of Modern Art Library  
Deirdre Lawrence, Brooklyn Museum Library  
James Mitchell  
Rachael Morrison, Museum of Modern Art Library  
Lindsey Reynolds, Whitney Museum of American Art Library  
Sara Rubinow, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum  
Lori Salmon, New York Public Library  
David Senior, Museum of Modern Art Library  
Susan E. Thomas, Long Island University Brooklyn Library  
Jennifer Tobias, Museum of Modern Art Library  
Tony White, Maryland Institute College of Art  
 
New book to benefit the Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference
Each year the Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference commissions a new artists’ book as part of its program. Previously commissioned artists include Eve Fowler, Dexter Sinister, David Horvitz, Triin Tamm, and Emily Roysdon, and the “assembled magazine” Adventures, produced by Aaron Flint Jamison. This year, James Hoff will produce a facsimile of Russel Arundel’s unknown classic Everybody’s Pixillated (Little, Brown and Company 1937), which the OED cites as the first instance in which the word “doodle” was used in print. The book provides an in-depth analysis of the doodle and reproduces dozens of examples from famous politicians and cultural figures such as George Washington, Franklin Roosevelt, Cab Calloway, etc. There will be several die cut insertions of Hoff’s own graphic interventions, making each book a relatively unique object. Sales of the book help to support free admission to the Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference for all visitors. For more information, call (212) 925-0325 or write shannon@printedmatter.org.  

CONFERENCE SESSIONS    
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2014  
12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Fashion Publications  
The fashion industry has long used publications as a means of marketing, typically in glossy magazines and coffee table books. Throughout the 20th century these print forms embodied complicated relationships among artists and designers, the fashion industry, and publishers. The punk wave of the 70s and the later rise of lifestyle magazines like The Face, i-d, and Paper Magazine marked a shift from presenting fashion for the affluent to promoting the anti-fashion of youth subcultures. By the end of the century, new serial publications like Visionaire and Purple had dispensed with any obligation to present fashion, per se. They adopted the techniques of artists’ books and zines to make print objects that investigated fashion subjects. At the same time, individual fashion designers and artists produced print publications and worked as guest editors or art directors for magazines. Other book artists have parodied the fashion industry. This session explores the subject of fashion in artists’ and designers’ publications. Panelists: K8 Hardy, and Susan Cianciolo.    
2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Ceci N’est Pas Une Comic: Graphic Novels, Contemporary Art, and The Public  
The graphic novel is a genre that continues to gain in popularity. It is a growing segment, filling bookshelves nonstop with brilliant, innovative work and shaping ideas in visual culture. In this discussion, guests will speak about current trends in graphic novel writing and illustration in relation to contemporary art and its audiences. Panelists include artist Chitra Ganesh; cartoonist and illustrator Peter Kuper; and Daniel Norton, NYPL. The moderators will be Eric Ingram, SVA and Lori Salmon, NYPL.    
4:30 – 5:30 p.m. Pecha Kucha: Artist’s Books, Zines, and Artist Publishing   This year’s Pecha Kucha consists of 10 presentations, each presenter having 15 slides, each shown for 20 seconds. Each presenter has 5 minutes to discuss artist’s books, zines, or other artist publishing projects that they find interesting, are influenced by or intrigued with. The fast pace and strict time limits of this presentation format ensures for a lively, engaging and entertaining performance. [Pecha Kucha (peh-cha koo-cha) is the Japanese word for the sound of conversation, similar to the English term “chit-chat”.]   Organized and moderated by Tony White. Presenters include Erik van der Weijde (NYC/Brazil), Conor Stechschulte (Baltimore), Anthony Smyrski (Philadelphia), Chloe Maratte (Baltimore), Leila Prasertwaitaya (Washington, DC), Terence Hannum (Baltimore), Jon Evans (Houston, TX)
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2014    
12:00 – 1:30 p.m. The Re-Materialization of the Art Book: Contemporary Livres d’Artistes 
Often viewed as a conservative form, a deluxe trinket for wealthy collectors to leave on their coffee tables, even a relic of early-20th century art marketing, the livre d’artiste has evolved into an important site for collaboration between visual artists and writers. Three prominent scholars will discuss.    
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Photo Meets Text  
This panel explores how text and images can be integrated to create narrative in photobooks. Long existing side by side the photograph and the word have now collided. Unravelling and investigating the relationship of photography & writing can be complex and perhaps even mind/perception altering. Russet Lederman maps out some of the history of words and images and leads a discussion into the possible futures. Brad Zellar and Nicholas Muellner present from their experiences of their own extensive ‘field work’ as investigators, researchers and writers. Organized by Matthew Carson.    
4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Furthering the Critical Dialogue  
This session, in its seventh year, continues with a key theme all previous conferences: the state of artists’ books criticism. Exemplifying diverse approaches to criticism, speakers will discuss selected books by Phil Zimmermann. Panelists will not discuss the ‘state of artists’ books criticism,’ per se, but instead will focus on engaging in a critical evaluation and discussion of books by this designer / artist. Panelists: Cynthia Marsh, Austin Peay State University; Leslie Atzmon, Eastern Michigan University; Emily McVarish, California College of the Arts. Moderator: Tony White, Maryland Institute College of Art.    
6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Keynote: R. H. Quaytman and Susan Howe  
This year’s keynote features a conversation between artist R. H. Quaytman and her mother, poet and scholar Susan Howe. May Castleberry, Editor of publications of the Library Council of The Museum of Modern Art, will moderate discussion about the new collaborative publication Tom Tit Tot. The work knits together sixty-seven poems by Howe, with design elements and original prints by Quaytman.

CONFERENCE PRESENTERS    
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2014  
12:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Fashion Publications  
K8 Hardy
is an artist.  
Susan Cianciolo is a designer.  
Moderator Susan E. Thomas is a librarian at LIU Brooklyn, and has previously worked at CUNY and Pratt Institute. She has published articles in Art Documentation about art and design zines and periodicals and about contemporary artists’ recordworks. She was a speaker at CABC in 2009 and 2010 and at ARLIS/NA Toronto in 2012. She is also finishing a poetry collection, Camellia Vs. Azalia.    
2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Ceci N’est Pas Une Comic: Graphic Novels, Contemporary Art, and The Public  
Chitra Ganesh
is a Brooklyn-based artist. Her drawing, installation, text-based work, and collaborations suggest and excavate buried narratives typically absent from official canons of history, literature, and art. Through her experimental use of the comic and narrative drawing forms, she communicates submerged histories and alternative articulations of femininity to a broader public. Ganesh graduated from Brown University with a BA in comparative literature and art-semiotics and received her MFA from Columbia University.  
Peter Kuper’s illustrations and comics have appeared in magazines around the world, including MAD, where he has written and illustrated SPY vs. SPY in every issue since 1997. He is the co-founder of the political comic magazine World War 3 Illustrated. He has produced over two dozen books, including The System, Diario de Oaxaca, Drawn to New York, and comic adaptations of many Franz Kafka’s works, including “The Metamorphosis.” He has taught comics courses at the School of Visual Arts for 25 years and is a visiting professor at Harvard University.  
A champion for graphic literature, Daniel Norton is is a library administrative assistant who supports the graphic novels collection at the Mid-Manhattan Library of the New York Public Library. He is pursuing a BS in information and library services at the University of Maine at Augusta and intends to pursue a graduate degree focusing on libraries, access, and the powers of super heroes.  
Librarian Eric Ingram is a cataloguer and curator of the comics and graphic novel collection at the School of Visual Arts’ Visual Arts Library.  
Lori Salmon is a Senior Librarian at the Mid-Manhattan Library of the New York Public Library.    

4:30 – 5:30 p.m. Pecha Kucha: Artist’s Books, Zines, and Artist Publishing    
Organized and moderated by Tony White. Presenters include Erik van der Weijde (NYC/Brazil), Conor Stechschulte (Baltimore), Anthony Smyrski (Philadelphia), Chloe Maratte (Baltimore), Leila Prasertwaitaya (Washington, DC), Terence Hannum (Baltimore), Jon Evans (Houston, TX)

  
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2014    
12:00 – 1:30 p.m. The Re-Materialization of the Art Book: Contemporary Livres d’Artistes
   
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Photo Meets Text  
Russet Lederman
is a media artist, researcher, and Japanese photobook collector who lives in New York City. She has taught media art theory and practice at Pratt Institute, Parsons The New School for Design, and is currently a faculty member in the MFA Art Criticism & Writing program and MFA Computer Art department at the School of Visual Arts. Lederman has received awards and grants from Prix Ars Electronica and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.  
Brad Zellar has written and published fiction, and worked as a writer and editor for daily and weekly newspapers, as well as for both regional and national magazines. A former senior editor at City Pages, The Rake, and Utne Reader, Zellar is also the author of Suburban World: The Norling Photos, Conductors of the Moving World, and House of Coates, an expanded version of which is being reissued this fall by Coffee House Press. For the last three years he has been collaborating with Alec Soth on The LBM Dispatch, an irregularly published newspaper that chronicles American community life in the 21st century. Soth and Zellar are presently at work on a book documenting the experience.  
Nicholas Muellner is an artist who operates at the intersection of photography and writing. Through books, exhibitions and slide lectures, his projects investigate the limits of photography as a documentary pursuit and as an interface to literary, political and personal narratives. His recent textual and visual books include The Photograph Commands Indifference (A-Jump Books, 2009), and The Amnesia Pavilions (A-Jump Books, 2011). Muellner’s writings on photography have been published by MACK, Aperture, Afterimage, Triple Canopy and Routledge, and he also edits the Self Publish, Be Happy Pamphlet Series. His work has been supported by MacDowell and Yaddo Colony Fellowships, as well as grants from the Trust for Mutual Understanding and CEC Artslink.  
Matthew Carson is a Librarian and Archivist at the International Center of Photography in New York. He is also a co-founder of the 10×10 photobook organization. In 2013 he was a curator of the book component of the ICP Triennial: A Different Kind of Order. As a photography enthusiast and bibliomaniac he is the editor and a writer for the ICP library blog, Monsters and Madonnas.  
4:00 – 5:30 p.m. Furthering the Critical Dialogue    
Cynthia Marsh
is a narrative artist. She uses large, hand-carved wooden letters to begin a public conversation that takes form of books, broadsides, and printed environments. Currently, Ms. Marsh serves as a Professor of Art & Design and as Director of the Goldsmith Press & Rare Type Collection at Austin Peay State University. The Goldsmith Press has received numerous state and federal grants for its work in the public sector. Before moving to Tennessee in 1995, Cynthia produced limited edition books, prints, and illustrations (primarily for the entertainment industry) in Los Angeles, CA.  
Leslie Atzmon teaches at Eastern Michigan University, and is Professor, Graphic Design and Design History, in the Art Department. She received her MFA in graphic design at EMU, and her PhD in design history at Middlesex University in London, England. Atzmon has published in Design Issues, Design and Culture, Eye, and Visual Communication. She edited Visual Rhetoric and the Eloquence of Design (Parlor Press 2011), and is currently co-editing The Graphic Design Reader (Bloomsbury 2015) with Teal Triggs, and the collection Encountering Things with Prasad Boradkar (Bloomsbury 2015). Atzmon and colleague Ryan Molloy were awarded an NEA grant to run experimental book workshops, and to design a book on the history and future of books.  
Emily McVarish is a writer, designer, and book artist. Her work has been published by Granary Books and is held by major museums and libraries, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s artist’s book collection, Harvard University’s Printing and Graphic Arts Collection, and the British Library’s American Collections. She is Associate Professor of Graphic Design at California College of the Arts, where she teaches typography, writing, and design history. In collaboration with Johanna Drucker, she co-authored Graphic Design History: A Critical Guide published by Prentice Hall. Her writing has been featured in Visible Language and Design and Culture.  
Tony White is the Director of the Decker Library at the Maryland Institute College of Art. He has an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MLS from Indiana University, Bloomington. He is the Field Editor for Artists’ Books and Books for Artists for the College Art Association’s online reviews journal, and has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Artist’s Books. He has curated exhibitions at the Center for Book Arts in Manhattan, Yale University’s Sterling Library, Columbia College’s Center for Book and Paper Arts, and the Museum of Printing History, among others. He is a founding board member of the College Book Art Association.    
6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Keynote  
R.H. Quaytman
, born in Boston in 1961, is best known for her literate, photographically based, silk-screen-printed panel paintings presented in “chapters.” Her work has been exhibited at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Tate Modern, London, and the Renaissance Society in Chicago, among other institutions, and at the Venice Biennale.    
Susan Howe has received numerous honors and awards for her work, including the Bollingen Prize, two American Book Awards from the Before Columbus Foundation, and a Guggenheim fellowship; she has been a distinguished fellow at the Stanford Institute for Humanities, as well as the Anna-Maria Kellen Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. She taught for many years at the State University of New York at Buffalo, where she held the Samuel P. Capen Chair of Poetry and the Humanities.